Royal Proclamation of 1763

After the seven year war, from 1756-1763, the Royal Proclamation was created. Canada was under colonization and so they had to deal with the settlers and indigenous populations. A strategy they used to keep a peaceful relationship between these two groups was by creating the Royal Proclamation which was issued by King George III of Britain. The Proclamation built a system of government for former French colonies in North America. It also includes basic foundations for relations with the Aboriginals. An important part from the Proclamation was that Aboriginal land was separate from the land used for the North American colonies. The Royal Proclamation states that this land belongs to the Aboriginals for perpetuity. Also the could not be taken and only bought for British settlement and development. An Aboriginal group could only transfer lands to the British Crown, not to European settlers. This would occur as a  formal individual nation-to-nation basis (from the Indian nation to the Crown). The law did not recognize Aboriginals as merely individuals ,but as distinct peoples and political units within the British imperial system with the right to negotiate with the Crown. Though Aboriginals were not seen as in total equality because they were living under the protection of the Crown. Their relationship is recognized as a fiduciary relationship. Another reason to why the Royal Proclamtion was set is because the Crown was concerned that Aboriginals were being exploited by the likes of the European settlers and colonial officials.

How did Aboriginals feel about the Proclamation?

The Aboriginals thought the Royal Proclamation was a good deal. They got protection from the Crown and had all the land they needed.

The Royal Proclamation can be read at this link: http://www.solon.org/Constitutions/Canada/English/PreConfederation/rp_1763.html

Citation:

“The Royal Proclamation.” N.p., 20 Feb. 1996. Web. 13 June 2012. aaaaaaa<http://www.solon.org/Constitutions/Canada/English/PreConfederation/rp_1763.html&gt;.

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